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I can’t believe I’m writing this, but for the second time in two days, I’m doing a blog entry on a member of Canada’s Liberal Party who made a sexist Facebook post…oddly specific, right?  It’s so strange; when I first saw the story, I thought I was looking at the same candidate who inspired yesterday’s entry.

Here’s today’s story.  David Mossey is a Liberal party member who is running for office in the riding of Niagara West-Glanbrook.  In March 2013, he made this post, adding the note, “I agree!  Do you?”

David Mossey Facebook Post

The post features two pictures of a woman’s rear: one supposedly who did not do squats, and one who did.

Mossey deleted the post and issued this statement:

I sincerely apologize for the inappropriate post on my Facebook page which I have now removed. I exercised poor judgment but it was certainly not my intent to offend anyone.  As I told the premier when I apologized to her, I am proud to be a candidate for a party with a strong record of standing up for the rights of all women.

Of course, members of opposing parties attacked Mossey’s posts.  New Democratic party Parliament member Cindy Forster called the posts, “very disrespectful of women and women candidates from a candidate running for an elected provincial seat.”” Laurie Scott, a Progressive party Parliament member, called the posts “incredibly offensive and disgusting for someone putting their name forward to have this sexist and inappropriate material on their Facebook page.”  Scott also noted a larger problem:  “You would have easily found either of those two [referencing Jack Uppal's sexist posts] if they were vetting candidates properly.”  Does Scott’s name sound fimiliar?  It should.  She also attacked Jack Uppal after Uppal’s sexist Facebook note, and if you read this blog, you read her name yesterday!

A few points about this entire scandal.  First, what Laurie Scott said is correct.  Before parties support candidate’s for office they absolutely fully vet that candidate – and this includes a post-by-post review of that candidate’s social media.  Second, Mossey may have made this post over a year ago, but the timing is irrelevant.  What you post is important, not how recently.  It will be interesting to see, in a few decades, just how frequently social media attacks are used – particularly attacks from someone’s teenage and college years.

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